A Look at How Asthma Can Affect Your Vocal Cords

Many patients with asthma also suffer from vocal cord dysfunction (VCD). While the two problems can overlap, they are separate medical conditions. People with VCD experience the closing in of one or both vocal cords upon inhaling. This can lead to symptoms similar to asthma, such as shortness of breath, throat tightness, and wheezing. One of the key differences between VCD and asthma is that when VCD is triggered, patients primarily have trouble breathing in, as opposed to breathing out. Asthma specialists may consider a diagnosis of VCD when a patient’s asthma is not well-controlled or when exercise-induced symptoms are not responding to treatment.

 

To diagnose VCD, the asthma doctor may use a laryngoscopy or video stroboscopy to examine the vocal folds. Abnormal movements, swelling, inflammation, and irritation are all signs of VCD. Patients with both asthma and VCD must learn to differentiate the two sets of symptoms to determine when to use an asthma inhaler and when to use breathing exercises to treat VCD.

 

For compassionate care for cases both simple and complex, you can turn to Allergy & Asthma SpecialistsSM in Blue Bell, Lansdale, Philadelphia, Jenkintown, Pottstown, Doylestown, King of Prussia, or Collegeville, Pennsylvania. Use the online appointment scheduler tool at www.AllergyandAsthmaWellness.com or call 1-800-86COUGH to request an appointment with a board-certified asthma specialist.

 

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