Sign In

    A Guide to Asthma for the Newly Diagnosed

    Last updated 15 days ago

    Asthma is a chronic lung disease that causes difficulty breathing, coughing, wheezing, and chest tightness due to tightening of the airways. These symptoms occur during flare ups called asthma attacks, which can be highly disruptive for your routine. While there is no cure for asthma, symptoms can be significantly reduced with the right medical care and daily habits. If you have just been diagnosed with asthma, take a look at these helpful steps for keeping your symptoms in check. 

    Know the major triggers

    Asthma triggers may vary from person to person, but some common triggers for flare-ups include allergens (pollen, mold, dust mite dander), stress, airborne irritants, cigarette smoke, acute respiratory illnesses, and certain over-the-counter drugs such as aspirin. Understanding the triggers for your asthma can help you minimize asthma attacks and breathe easier.

    Ask your doctor about medication

    Aside from emergency asthma medication such as fast-acting inhalers, you may benefit from more preventive solutions like immunotherapy, aspirin desensitization, and prescription medications. Your allergy doctor will be able to provide the most effective treatments for your needs with a thorough evaluation of your health history and respiratory function.

    Increase physical activity

    While exercise can be a trigger for asthma, it may also be helpful in managing symptoms for some patients. You should ask your asthma and allergy doctor about safe ways to incorporate physical activity into your lifestyle so that you can increase your respiratory health over time.

    Create an emergency plan

    Even with well-managed asthma, you could still have an asthma attack. You will want to prepare by keeping an inhaler on hand and knowing steps to relax your breathing should you experience a bout of asthma.

    Under the care of Allergy & Asthma SpecialistsSM, you can learn to keep your asthma under control with personalized treatment at any of our 8 locations in King of Prussia, Center City Philadelphia, Pottstown, Collegeville, Doylestown, Jenkintown, or Lansdale. You can also find detailed information about a number of allergic diseases or schedule an appointment by visiting us at allergyandasthmawellness.com or by calling 1-800-86COUGH, ext 2. 

    Atopic Dermatitis: The First Step in the Allergic March

    Last updated 23 days ago

    Allergy doctors use the terms “Allergic March” or “Atopic March” to describe the common progression of allergic diseases throughout a patient’s lifetime. Quite often, patients are first diagnosed with atopic dermatitis, or eczema, early in childhood. This condition refers to an allergic inflammatory condition of the skin. It is referred to as an atopic disease because it typically affects individuals with a personal or family history of hay fever or asthma.

    Symptoms

    Patients with atopic dermatitis typically develop a dry red, itchy, scaly rash that usually appears behind the elbows and knees. However, when the disease develops in infancy, the child may have tiny bumps on his or her cheeks. The dry, scaly skin tends to itch intensely. When patients engage in prolonged scratching or rubbing, the skin may become thicker than usual. Intense scratching can also lead to the development of crusted sores or weeping lesions.

    Triggers                                                                                                                    

    The intensity of this allergic disease tends to wax and wane periodically. Certain triggers can lead to a flare-up of symptoms. These triggers commonly include sweating, overheating, emotional stress, and consumption of certain foods in those that have food allergy. Exposure to irritants or allergens is another possible trigger.

    Treatments

    An allergy doctor can develop an effective management plan for patients with atopic dermatitis. It’s advisable to identify a patient’s triggers and to avoid them whenever possible. Additionally, antihistamines may be taken to alleviate the itchiness. Topical steroids or non-steroid anti-inflammatory medications can relieve the inflammation of the skin.

    Prevention

    In addition to preventing exposure to triggers, atopic dermatitis may be managed with lifestyle modifications. Allergy doctors recommend taking lukewarm baths, since hot water removes natural oils from the skin. Moisturizer should be applied daily within minutes of bathing. Patients should wear 100% cotton soft fabrics, and try to avoid fabric softeners, bleach and excessive sweating.

    Fellowship-trained, board-certified allergists/immunologists comprise the entire physician staff of Allergy & Asthma Specialists. Allergy doctors at this premier medical practice provide comprehensive allergy and asthma diagnostics and state of the art treatment, including two types of immunotherapy, at offices located in center city Philadelphia, Blue Bell, King of Prussia, Jenkintown, Doylestown, Lansdale, Pottstown, and Collegeville, Pennsylvania. Schedule today online at www.AllergyandAsthmaWellness.com or by calling 1-800-86COUGH option 2.

    Pinpointing the Causes of Asthma Attacks

    Last updated 28 days ago

    Individuals with asthma have inflamed and swollen airways. When an asthma attack occurs, the inflammation worsens, which makes it difficult to breathe. When you visit an allergy doctor, you’ll learn that identifying your asthma attack triggers is one step in managing your symptoms. Some common asthma attack triggers include exercise, barometric pressure changes, and infections. Irritants such as cigarette smoke and allergens such as animal dander are other possible triggers.

    You can hear more about what occurs during an asthma attack by watching this video. This video uses simple diagrams to explain the link between inflammation and asthma attacks. It also discusses the role of bronchoconstriction in causing respiration difficulties.

    Board certified allergists/immunologists comprise the entire physician staff of Allergy & Asthma Specialists. Allergy doctors at this premier medical practice provide comprehensive allergy and asthma diagnostics and state of the art treatment, including two types of immunotherapy, at offices located in Philadelphia, Blue Bell, King of Prussia, Jenkintown, Doylestown, Lansdale, Pottstown, and Collegeville, PA. Schedule today online or by calling 1-800-86-COUGH.

    Signs of a Reaction to an Antibiotic

    Last updated 1 month ago

    Medications, including antibiotics, have the potential to cause allergic reactions. In fact, antibiotics are the most common culprits of drug-related allergic reactions. An adverse reaction to an antibiotic may involve symptoms such as high blood pressure, coughing, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and facial swelling. If you experience an allergic reaction to an antibiotic, you’re likely to suffer from a rash, hives, throat swelling and tightness, and joint swelling. An allergic reaction to an antibiotic can occur within a matter of hours of taking the medication or may take weeks to develop.

    Allergic reactions to antibiotics can even be life-threatening. This is known as anaphylaxis. If you experience any of the symptoms of anaphylaxis, call 911 immediately. These can include the sensation of a lump in the throat, hoarseness, throat tightness, wheezing, trouble breathing, and chest tightness. Anaphylaxis can also cause a tingling sensation in the scalp, lips, hands, or feet.

    Board certified allergists/immunologists comprise the entire physician staff of Allergy & Asthma Specialists. Allergy doctors at this premier medical practice provide comprehensive allergy and asthma diagnostics and state of the art treatment, including two types of immunotherapy, at offices located in center city Philadelphia, Blue Bell, King of Prussia, Jenkintown, Doylestown, Lansdale, Pottstown, and Collegeville, Pennsylvania. Schedule today online at www.AllergyandAsthmaWellness.com or by calling 1-800-86COUGH.

    Eliminating Indoor Allergens in Your Home

    Last updated 1 month ago

    It’s common to experience allergic reactions during plant-pollinating seasons. Yet, many individuals suffer from symptoms such as nasal congestion and chronic cough throughout the year. Allergy doctors recommend taking steps to eliminate allergens within the home to improve symptoms. Common indoor allergens include dust mites, animal dander, and mold spores.

    Combat Dust Mites

    Cleaning the home frequently can help keep dust mites under control. Dust all of the furniture regularly while wearing a NIOSH rated N95 dust mask. Use a vacuum with a HEPA filter to remove dust from carpeting or consider swapping your carpet for hardwood floors. Avoid or minimize the use of throw rugs in the bedroom. Dust mites are also frequently found in curtains, bedding, and upholstered furniture. Wash the curtains and bedding every 10 days with hot water, and invest in allergy-proof bedding covers. Stuffed animals can also collect dust, so either keep them out of the bedroom or wash them often. Clean upholstered furniture with products that deactivate dust mites. Or, consider purchasing leather furniture or other furniture with a nonporous surface.

    Reduce Animal Dander

    Dusting and cleaning the fabrics in your home will help control animal dander as well as dust mites. However, there are some additional steps you can take to reduce allergic reactions to animal dander. Keep your bedroom door closed to prevent your pet from gaining access. You can also bathe your pet at least once per week to cut down on dander and use a HEPA air cleaner in your bedroom.

    Eliminate or Reduce Mold

    If you have reactions to mold spores, maintaining proper ventilation in your home is particularly important. Use exhaust fans in your kitchen and bathroom. During the warmer months, open the window in your bathroom while showering. Disinfect your home regularly, especially the bathroom, kitchen, and basement. You may need a dehumidifier or air cleaner to maintain proper ventilation in your basement.

    Fellowship-trained, board-certified allergists/immunologists comprise the entire physician staff of Allergy & Asthma Specialists. Allergy doctors at this premier medical practice provide comprehensive allergy and asthma diagnostics and state of the art treatment, including two types of immunotherapy, at offices located in center city Philadelphia, Blue Bell, King of Prussia, Jenkintown, Doylestown, Lansdale, Pottstown, and Collegeville, Pennsylvania. Schedule today online at www.AllergyandAsthmaWellness.com or by calling 1-800-86COUGH, option 2.

Do you like Allergy & Asthma Specialists?



Links

  • Recent Posts
    • Loading posts... Spinner
  • View All
  • Recent Comments
    • Loading comments... Spinner
  • Popular Tags
    • Loading tags... Spinner